Gourd Seeds Are Up!

I'm starting to work on larger sculptures, but finding large gourds is becoming a challenge - and shipping is increasingly expensive. So even though I live in the North Country of upstate New York where our short growing season makes it all but impossible to grow oversized gourds, I am determined to try growing my... Continue Reading →

Creative Journey of a Riverbowl

EXCELLENT NEWS! I just finished Riverbowl III and am excited to announce the piece been acquired by The Folklife Center at Crandall Library in Glens Falls, NY for their collection. Thank you to Todd DeGarmo, Founding Director. I am celebrating this great honor! It took me three months to finish the piece. As I was working... Continue Reading →

Dandelion Wine – An Artful Adventure

This started out as a simple dream of making homemade wine. It turned into an exploration I never expected. My first taste of dandelion wine was disappointing. One of my cousins used to make it every year and it always tasted like pure rot-gut. It wasn't until I met a 70-year-old Italian in Montreal's Little... Continue Reading →

Red Clover

This red clover is among the oldest species on the property, dating back to at least 1962 despite having been weeded, mowed and otherwise ignored. As a child, I was fascinated by the white markings on its leaves, making it seem quite exotic for such a simple plant. In the early days of gardening with... Continue Reading →

Art of the Yukon

Join us on a voyage without leaving home! Experience Canada's Yukon Territory through the eyes of its artists as Artful Vagabond's Serena Kovalosky takes you on an artful tour, in collaboration with international art magazine, ACS Magazine.

Serena Smoking Pot

In my research of the roots of sculpture, I became particularly interested in the figures and vessels carved from wood that were used for ceremonial purposes. After many years, particularly with pieces that came in contact with organic materials such as plant resin and animal fat while held over an open fire, a deep ebony... Continue Reading →

The Leningrad Underground and a Russian Rebel

Leningrad, Russia – 1970s. A talented young painter, Ilya Shevel, enters the Secondary Art School of Russia’s Academy of Fine Art, but finds the Soviet-mandated academic style of realism too restrictive and “uninteresting.” At home, the artist is surrounded by the art and creative thinking that truly inspires him. His father, architect Vladimir Shevel (Shevelenko),... Continue Reading →

Pushing Boundaries: Stone Lettering as Fine Art

Nicholas Benson’s art is the sculpted word. A third-generation stone carver, calligrapher and designer, and recipient of an NEA Grant and a MacArthur Fellowship, Benson’s hand-carved work can be seen on memorials and buildings throughout the United States, including the National World War II Memorial inscriptions and the The National Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial inscriptions... Continue Reading →

The Mathematical Artist

When confronted with certain mathematical tasks, I’ve met many artists who will throw up their hands and say, “I’m not good at math – I’m an artist!” Their statement always confounded me since I’m a professional artist who also happens to have a strong mathematical mind. What I eventually learned is that while the first... Continue Reading →

Longing for an America of the 1950s

America in the 1950s holds a certain nostalgia, especially for those of us baby boomers who were born during the two decades immediately following World War II. Life was simpler back then and the world was a kinder, gentler place that was filled with magic that came from our unlimited imaginations. There were no cell... Continue Reading →

Function or Fine Art? – Day 354

Sculptors, ceramicists and other three-dimensional artists often decide early in their careers whether their goal is to produce work that is functional, or work that is research-oriented for the fine art world. Ceramics in particular is so often considered a “functional” medium, however there are artists who enjoy pushing the boundaries of that perception, experimenting... Continue Reading →

An Art for Commuters – Day 341

Anyone who has ever spent time commuting on a public transportation system knows the feeling of “being neither here nor there” while enroute to work or home. Waiting for a subway train to arrive, surrounded by others on their way to their individual destinations, we are in transition, detached from our surroundings and from each... Continue Reading →

Artful Relationships – Day 306

Creating art is a study in relationships – the artist’s creative process involves a constant weighing and balancing of the relationships between forms, colors and textures to create a final piece that resonates with integrity. Human relationships are much more complex and incorporating these issues into the creative context brings an additional set of challenges... Continue Reading →

A Wearable Canvas – Day 234

Artists are always looking for ways to expand their market while protecting the integrity of their work. Sculptors cast their sculptures in alternative materials while painters might create a series of limited-edition prints or find other unique ways to get their work out to a wider public. Richard Malinsky’s paintings are collected for their emotionally... Continue Reading →

Do Inner-City Kids Need Art? – Day 198

In recent years, art education has been on the front line of school budget cuts in the U.S., which raises the question: Is art really a necessary component of an effective educational curriculum? Ask the kids from a certain inner-city school in Chicago’s south side……. Meg Peterson is an artist with studios in Chicago and... Continue Reading →

Shaman of the Knives

There is a legend among the Inuit of the Northwest Territories of Canada that tells the story of Kujiak, a young boy who was considered an outcast by his mother and three sisters and forced to live with the dogs in the foyer of their igloo. He had made himself a knife in order to... Continue Reading →

Wild Thoughts and Bowls – Day 159

The expression of movement is always a challenge for those of us who work with the sculptural form – but when an artist transcends the grounded physicality of the medium, the result can be one of awe and surprise. Johnson Cheung-shing Tsang is a Hong Kong sculptor specializing in ceramics, stainless steel sculpture and public... Continue Reading →

Embracing Diversity – Day 130

In most creative realms, trends are often what drives sales and, particularly in recent years, a majority of the large-scale, commercially-driven art, music, film and literature we consume is created from proven “formulas” and popular themes. I am always grateful to discover artists who explore subjects, themes and styles that are outside of the mainstream... Continue Reading →

Art Takes Time – Day 112

#101 – Art takes time to create and one must take the time to experience it. Here are more inspiring thoughts from previous essays: Day 108 - Should Art Match the Furniture? Day 114 - An Alphabet of Sand, Seaweed and Nails Day 82 - How to See with the Eyes of a Stranger Art... Continue Reading →

Art and Mysticism – Day 111

[Today’s featured artwork for Day 111 of the 365 Days Project is by Jina Wallwork.] Life, death, art, rebirth. Bringing the mysteries into the physical world. #111 – Artists and mystics walk the path beyond the veil, moving from the physical world into the realm of spirit. While both use that experience in their work,... Continue Reading →

A Green Alternative to Printmaking – Day 110

[Today’s featured artwork for Day 110 of the 365 Days Project is by Dan Welden.] Visual artists often work with toxic materials, sometimes sacrificing their health in the pursuit of their art. Here is one artist’s “green” alternative. #110 – Taking the “toxic” out of making art. Most of the visual artists I know are... Continue Reading →

Should Art Match the Furniture? – Day 108

[Today’s featured artwork for Day 108 of the 365 Days Project is by John Zajac.] Is art supposed to match the furniture? #108 – Art is for everyone, regardless of income, education or cultural background. But it is not merely decorative. Purchasing fine art has long been the exclusive realm of kings and queens, savvy... Continue Reading →

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